Customize your Windows 10 experience

OK, you upgraded from Windows 7 or one of the Windows 8 flavors and want to personalize your machine.  In previous versions of Windows, all the way back to Windows 95, you could create themes, have slideshow backgrounds and change your color scheme.  You can still do that, but Microsoft seems to have gone out of its way to make it way more complicated than it should be.  This is one thing in Windows 10 they got wrong.

This short little guide should help.

Change the background picture to a slide show

settingsPersonalizationThis is actually easy to do, just buried. So, to start, you will need to create a folder and put the pictures you want to show in the folder.  Next, open up the SETTINGS app and select PERSONALIZATION or, right click the desktop and select PERSONALIZE. Next, select BACKGROUND. In the BACKGROUND selection box, click the arrow and select SLIDESHOW. Below that, there will be another button where you can actually choose the folder that contains the photos you wish to include in the slide show. Select the folder, click the Use folder button and that’s that. Your slideshow should start. You can change the duration, shuffle the pictures, etc.

ThemessettingsTheme

One post on Microsoft’s own site says that the ability to create themes is gone, by design, from Windows 10.  This seems true, you cannot create a new, blank theme.  You can, however, SAVE changes to the CURRENT THEME, which there is ALWAYS a current theme.  So, set up your background image, system sounds and color scheme the way you want and then save the theme.  Here’s how…

settingsTheme3Setup your background image, if you want a slide show, follow the instructions above. Now, to setup your sounds, right click the desktop and select PERSONALIZE. From there, select THEMES.  There is a link to setup the system sounds, click that and it works and looks EXACTLY like it did in previous versions of Windows.  Once done, Click OK to close that window.  Repeat the process for the mouse, if you want to change that as well. Once it is all the way you want, click the first link, Theme settings. This takes you to the OLD Theme page, but there are no options on the page.  However, the very first Theme listed is the current theme and it is called ‘UNSAVED THEME’ Right click that and select which type of theme you wish to save. The first choice simply saves the settings for YOUR use. The second choice gives the ability to package the theme so you can share it.  Make your choice and give it a name. Click OK and your new theme becomes a selection along with any themes you already had.  NOTE: in place upgrades will preserve any themes you made in previous versions of Windows. New installs will have a few that come with Windows 10.

Also, note that the ‘unsaved theme’ choice is missing now. It will reappear once you make a change.

Change the Lock Screen and the Screen Saver

settingsPersonalization2You can change the image that displays when you boot the computer or lock it.  Right click the desktop, select PERSONALIZE and then LOCK SCREEN.  From here, you can change the image for the lock screen and make it a slide show, static image or a BING picture of the day.  Click Background selection button (the down arrow) and make your choice. If you select SlideShow, you do the same thing here that you did for the desktop background slideshow. Once you select the background, you have other things you can set, like the application updates you want to see (for example, calendar events, weather, etc.) Set those by clicking one of the little squares with the plus sign. You will see a list of available apps to use for notices here.  Not all apps will show since not all provide this functionality.settingsLockscreen2

You can also change the screen saver from here. Scroll down until you see Screen Saver settings. Click the link and you will see the screen saver settings that we all know and love.  Select your screen saver and click OK.

There are other things you can do to further customize your experience.  You can change the color scheme from the PERSONALIZATION page.  I have it set to use the primary color of the background image, but you can make it whatever you want.  Go on and explore the Personalization page.  You will find most of the things that were in the previous versions of Windows, just looking a little different now and, unfortunately, often buried where you would not think to look…like the screen saver settings in the LOCK SCREEN page. 

Any questions? Post them in the comments and I’ll try to answer.

Windows 10, fun things to know

With Windows 10 about to launch, I thought I would share some tips on using the ‘new’ operating system.   If you have used Windows 8/8.1, some of these will be familiar.

EDGE – Internet Explorer’s replacement browser

  • When you fire up EDGE, you will notice, right away, thisedgefave is not Internet Explorer.  It does what all browsers do, and that’s serve up the now standard fare of HTML/Javascript/CSS based pages.  It does so very quickly and much more standards based than Internet Explorer ever did.  However, upon upgrading to Windows 10, EDGE knows nothing about your favorites. As you would with another browser, you must import your favorites.  Do so by clicking the ‘Hub’ icon, it’s the three uneven lines on your EDGE window, in the upper right corner.  When the panel opens, click the Star icon (your favorites) and then select Import Favorites and then the browser you wish to import from. It will take a few seconds, depending on the number of links you have.  Your favorites are now imported.
  • One of the things about tabbed browsing is having a tab play audio when you don’t want it win10EdgeNiceor expect it. Finding that tab, especially if you have many open, isn’t always obvious. With Edge, in Windows 10, it is a bit more obvious. Refer to the photo, the opened tab has an audio indicator and a play button. These let you know which tab or tabs have media playing. You can switch to that tab and take care of the offending media.

  • In the current version, 10240, EDGE does not have the ability to display multi levels of forward or backward pages.  For example, in IE or Chrome, if you right click the back button, you will see 10 levels or so of history. Not so in EDGE.

START Menu

newstartThe Start Menu, which Microsoft decided to bring back from the dead, has been greatly enhanced. It is also customizable.

  • In Desktop mode, the Start menu takes up little space. It has, on the left side, that traditional style Start Menu listing of applications and functionality. On the right side, is what remains of the Windows 8/8.1 Start Page.  You can pin things to the Start Page and the live tiles will work, provided the tile belongs to Windows Store application.   The whole thing can be resized by grabbing the upper right corner of the menu and dragging it up and to the right.
  • In Desktop mode, you can make the Start Menu take up the entire screen, if you like that. To do so, go to Settings->Personalization->Start. Click ‘Use Full Screen’ and close the settings.  Click the Start Button and you should see a full screen Start Menu/Page.
  • Right clicking on a live tile will pop up a menu giving more control over them.  You can unpin the tile, resize it, turn it on or off, pin to the taskbar or uninstall the application.
  • You can make the taskbar, action center and start page transparent by opening Settings->Personalization->Colors. Turn on the transparency by clicking ‘Make Start, taskbar, and action center Transparent’ slider.

Task Manager

taskmanThe ALT-Tab task switching, though looking different, still works the same. Microsoft has taken that notion, added in a bit of the Vista style task switching and went full screen with tiled representations of the running applications. You can select an application to switch to OR…and you LInux people will deride this as old, send an application to a new desktop. Yes, Windows 10 now has multiple desktops.  You can activate this feature by clicking on the desktop icon next to the Cortana icon on the task bar.

 

So, there you have a few nice features of Windows 10.  Check back for more.

Windows update, activation and 10: two major problems and a happy ending

As part of his graduation, we gave my oldest son a gaming computer. It’s nothing too fancy, a middle of the road gaming rig so he can play League of Legends with as little ‘lag’ as possible. The machine we got him, a CyberPower PC special from Best Buy, is no slouch: quad core, 3.7ghz processor, AMD/ATI R 6700 graphics, 8GB of RAM and a 2.2TB HDD.  Oh, it runs Windows 8.1.

Now, the computer came with a lesser graphics card, my son inherited the R 6700 (I think that’s the number) card and, ever since we put it in, it has caused several blue screens.  In all of the time I’ve run 8 or 8.1, I think I’ve had two such issues. Well, with the last blue screen, came an activation issue.

Windows did not think it was activated. 

Great.

So, I proceed to activate.  No go.  After several attempts, I discover the key is now invalid.  What?

A call to Microsoft resulted in finger pointing to CyberPower PC. The key is an OEM key and Microsoft refuses to help on them.  So, I call the OEM. As it was on a Saturday, they had limited hours and I had both limited patience and battery on my phone.  After 45 minutes on hold, my phone was losing juice and I lost patience. 

Remembering that I had a clean, legal copy of WIndows 8 PRO-with an unused key-I thought, well, I’ll just install 8, upgrade to 8.1 and put him on the Windows 10 track.  Simple.

It started out great, Windows 8 took 20 to 30 to install.  Upon the desktop setup, I proceed to the Windows Store to grab 8.1. No go. Have to update first.  How stupid is this? So, I goto Windows Update.  Boy, my friend Sam was right, this damn thing is broken. Sorry Sam. Over 150 updates awaited.  So, I told my son to keep an eye on it and my wife and I went out.

At some point, it appears the computer went to sleep.  DURING UPDATING.  My son lets me know.  Well, the interrupted update BROKE the update process!

Nothing I did fixed it.  It’s 11pm now and I’ve wasted the day-save the two hours I was with my wife-on this bloody computer. Not happy.

So, I recalled that one can go to Windows 10 directly from 7, 8 or 8.1. So, I went ahead and upgraded to the most current build of Windows 10.  The upgraded took about 45 minutes, but it worked like a charm.  We had to install Direct 3d/dx 9, but League of Legends worked and did not need to be reinstalled – which, itself, takes hours and hours and hours.

So far, with one exception, 10 has worked very well.  It did blue screen, but the error was really odd and had to do with sound. This computer has some odd hardware, so I am thinking it is a driver issue and I plan to check them all for compatibility.

This whole process was just a joke.  Windows Activation is the most assinine thing yet.  There is just no reason for Microsoft to continue with that mess. It does not stop those who want to steal it and just causes major headaches for those of who play by the rules.  And Windows Update? Holy hell.  What a major blemish that has become.

Microsoft, I implore you, do the right thing and ditch activation. Fix the update process.  And hire people who can CLEARLY speak the same bloody language as those who call your centers.

That is all.

Windows 10, good and bad and on the way

Microsoft is in the home stretch with Windows 10 for PC.  Releasing TWO builds in two days, they are proving that they are agile, listening and, above all, making sure this thing works—it HAS to.  Overall, the latest builds have been great and are usable for daily work.  The latest build, 10159, also includes the Edge branded browser, new wallpaper and tweaks everywhere.  10158 fixed a whole raft of issue that I had (like the Start Menu not displaying, pretty big since it is now the only way to launch applications easily) and made it much more usable.  The little changes, like fonts, color changes, icons, responsiveness and stability have all added up to a product that is really close to ‘done’. 

The avenue, however, that they—still—have a problem is consistency.  They have come a long way, but, sadly, still have a long way to go.  They still have an ugly mess of old style dialogs intermixed with the newer metro style. 

For example, ‘Desktop Icon Settings’ is STILL the old Windows 95 style!  Twenty years have passed and they still are using the SAME dialogs.  Yes, they tweaked it, but it is, essentially, the same.Windows 10 159 build inconsistency 1

Most of the personalization stuff is still in the old dialogs with some redundant settings in the metro style.

One other problem they have, and I’ve seen no real change, is the stubbornness of the Windows Update mechanism.  I have a couple of drivers that I really do NOT want updated. Windows INSISTS on updating them.  One is Arduino related and I really want the Windows 7 driver to be left alone. It works and does not degrade my PC’s performance where the Windows 8 driver does.  The other driver, likely, will be updated for Windows 10, but, for now, the IDT audio driver for Windows 7 works much better under Windows 10 than the Windows 8.1 driver.  But, in the interim, Update, leave em alone!  And, speaking of update, I hope the finished Windows update just works and doesn’t gum up peoples machines. It is the number one complaint I hear. I rarely have any issues (other than the aforementioned driver updates) with it, but others do. PLEASE, Microsoft, get this right.

Now, a few things I do like…

The over all look and feel is nice.  It blends the best of Windows 8 and Windows Vista. Yes, VIsta.  Vista was a great looking operating system and so was Windows 8 (not 8.1, 8) but both were maligned for some reason … I can’t think of any at the moment.  (wink, wink)

I like the integration with Windows Mobile 10, Cortana, One Drive and the support for competing technologies.  Microsoft has realized that they are no longer the top of the heap.

The Edge browser. This thing is hot.  While it is still a bit unstable, there is no doubt that it screams along.  Pages pop up and, for the most, render as they are supposed to.  I’ve seen a few weird things, but I suspect it was to support IE and that Edge rendered it as other browsers would have done.

Windows 10 will be released to everyone on July 29, 2015.  Most people should be eligible for a free upgrade. Go to Microsoft.com to see if you qualify.

CES 2015: webOS, tablets and funky tv’s

The 2015 International CES is over.  Among the products and product lines shown off were curved Televisions, 4K TV, ‘quantum dot’ TV, TV dongles, tablets, smartphones and accessories, self driving cars and more computers-of all shapes and sizes. Oh, and smart watches and fitness bands. Lots of them.

So, where do we start?  Well, lets start with one of my favorite operating systems. This OS is now in televisions, phones and … soon, smart watches.  Yep, webOS is making a splash with LG spearheading the way.  They purchased the OS from HP in 2013 and began adapting it for use in smart televisions.  The first effort, while it sold five million televisions, was less than stallear. webOS 2.0, however, is said to be fast and easier to code for than the previous release.  It has also been shrunk down to watch size.  LG has, seemingly, teamed with Audi to produce a watch that can open the car doors, place calls and a plethora of things.  LG denies it and Audi was just trying to show off the car.  The Verge reports seeing an ‘about’ screen that shows the webOS version.  For a dead OS, it sure is making a splash.  The interesting thing is that, at the current rate, LG will have more webOS devices in the wild than Palm/HP Palm ever could.

Intel showed off its Compute Stick, an HDMI dongle for your Television that is a complete Windows computer on a stick.  Selling for $149, the Compute Stick features an Atom processor, 2GB of RAM, 32GB of storage and features a micro-SD slot for future expansion. So, it is a rather spartan PC, but, it is very portable and Wifi enabled,so you could just throw it in a bag, your pocket, whatever and take it with you instead of a laptop. The drawbacks, of course, are that you do need a keyboard and mouse AND an HDMI enabled display. But, if you don’t mind these limitations, the Stick might just be your travelling companion.  A cheaper, $89 version running Linux will also be available.  Though, the Linux version sports half the RAM and only 8GB of storage.

I’m no Sony fan, but, I would definitely purchase their newest 65 inch set. This thing is 4.9 mm thick. The 4K set is thinner than most current smartphones.  It is edge to edge awesomness.

In a big nod to Microsoft’s Surface tablets, a group of former Google engineers introduced the Remix. To be offered up next month via a Kickstarter campaign, the device has many of the same features of Surface, looks like the Surface and its software, another Android fork, even resembles Windows 8 applications and its mail client is a rip off of Windows 8 mail.  Still, It says much about Surface that these gentlemen would decide to ‘me too’ the tablet.

Speaking of tablets, there were plenty to choose from. From a six inch Windows tablet all the way up to a 65 inch, 4k enabled tablet from FUHU.  Perhaps the most interesting ones, however, are the under $150 Windows tablets which are going to be available in the next month or so.  There were no new Kindles, but there were a bunch of Android tablets as well. No one tablet really stood out (well, maybe that 65 incher) but they were all well represented.  Have a look on CNet’s News.Com for more.

For a complete wrap up of the events at CES, the Verge has a good summary.

Windows 9…make that 10…

Tech-Preview_Start-menuMicrosoft, today, introduced Windows 10, the successor to Windows 8.x, Windows Phone 8.x and Windows RT.  While today’s presentation was aimed solely at the Enterprise, there were nuggets for everyone else as well, especially those who did not like the current version (and probably did not even bother to try it) and its Start Page and tiles.

Indeed, todays presentation showed off changes for the desktop and how Windows will handle the variety of devices.  This means figuring out what it is running on and, in the case of tablet/laptop hybrids.  If it detects a touch screen, it will default to the Windows 8 style with the Start Page, touch centricity and tiles.  If it detects a mouse and keyboard, it defaults to the desktop and the keyboard/mouse centricity.  It is something called Continuum and looks rather nice.

The desktop receives a welcome upgrade in the inclusion of the Start Menu with Tiles.  The Charms bar, still in the Technical Preview showed at the presentation, is accessible in much the same way. The task manager has a new button on the task bar and the ability to create, manage and use multiple desktops is built in. The feature resembles similar features found in Linux and Mac OS X.Tech-Preview_Task-view-500x281

Even the Command window got updated: copy and paste now work IN the window, no need to use an inconvenient context menu.

Windows 8 Style apps can now run in windows right on the desktop, which, for some, increases their usefulness.  The Start Menu is both old and new and incorporates a pared down Start Page. Part of it is the old style menu, the other half is the pared down start page.  A nice compromise.

Another interesting thing Microsoft has done is enhance the Windows 7 Snap feature. Previously, you could drag a window to the right side and snap it in place and then drag another to the left and snap it. Now, from the new task list, you snap up to four windows, certainly something a power user or developer will welcome.Tech-Preview_Three-program-snap-and-suggestions-500x281

Terry Myerson and Joe Belfiore stuck around for questions after the presentation. Among the questions asked was what this does to Windows RT and Windows Phone. The answer was that Windows 10 would be available to the majority of devices running Windows. Previously, they had said it would, in fact, run on ARM based devices…which includes Windows RT tablets. Now, recently, it was revealed that the majority of Tablets are, in fact, RT. So, I cannot imagine that this segment will get ignored. Windows Phone will be replaced with Windows 10, something we already knew.

All in all, the new version looks promising and you can get your hands on a very early build, starting Wednesday, October 1, 2014.  Go to http://preview.windows.com/ to download the ISO file.

My case against touch: struggling with touchscreens, it should not be this hard

Touchscreens have been around since the 1960’s, possibly earlier. Many schemes have been used, everything from the current overlay technology all the way back to the old light and photocell matrix and everything in between.  There are advantages to them all and many, many disadvantages.  The current flurry of technology employing touchscreens was sparked by the innovative iPhone from Apple. 

Steve Jobs despised the tried and true stylus. He famously said that we already have the best stylus: our fingers. Well, not so fast there, Mr. Jobs.

On large screen devices, like the full size iPad, my Asus Vivo Tab with Windows 8, and pretty much any device that is 8 inches or larger, your finger may work great. But, not so much on small screens.

I have found that it is not really the technology itself, but the user interface that is the real problem.  Especially with the bloody on screen keyboard. If a hardware keyboard fan ever needed a reason to bring back an actual keyboard, one needs to look no further that the iPhone. (Hot on its heels: Windows Phone 8).

The iPhone’s onscreen keyboard is just awful. I constantly hit wrong keys. Now, some of it is my fault, most however, are not. When it isn’t being responsive, it’s just too damn small.  Which is really surprising since the best on screen keyboard I’ve ever used in a small form factor is that on the Zune HD. Both Apple and Microsoft should take a look at that one.  Funny, Microsoft designed it and promptly forgot it when doing the Windows Phone 8 OS.

Aside from too small or unresponsive, the predictive text is also a problem as is spell check/autocorrect. Now, these should be very useful features and, indeed, can be. BUT…when they screw up, they REALLY screw up.  Yes, you can disable them, but, why should you have to? They should just work and they should give you an easy way to maintain and add to the database. If they do, then there’s no easy way to find it.

At any rate, why can’t these companies come up with decent on screen keyboards? Ones that work. Ones that are not hard to use and that just work. You should not have to think about HOW to type while typing.

User Interfaces are another source of frustration.  For example, the antiquated Windows desktop is very difficult to use simply because its widgets are just too small for your fingers and designed to work with a mouse and not your finger.  On iOS, they did a much better job with the UI, however, the multifinger gestures do not always work the same. And, sometimes you swipe down, sometimes you swipe left to right to do the same thing. iPhones present a real challenge due to the screens size. I find it difficult to play some games on this device because of the size of the screen. Other apps, like the music player app, can be difficult to use, especially if you have larger fingers. I find myself constantly selecting the wrong thing simply because the icons are too small.

In this new world of touch, designers need to take a step back and actually use the stuff they put out, before they put it out.I suspect a number of things would be caught and corrected prior to release. I’m sure such products would dominate. 

RIP, Windows XP, it was a heck of a ride

Windows xp ProfessionalWindows XP is nearing the end of its long run.  Microsoft pulls the plug on support for the dinosaur of operating systems.  What this means is that it will no longer be patched for security issues.  It also means that, as time goes on, fewer applications will run on the beast. 

For whatever reason, people are clinging to it for dear life. Granted, most of the remaining installations are at corporations, corporations that may have internal apps that will not work on newer operating systems. However, there are a fair number of people who just do not wish to upgrade. Many think that moving on to Vista, Windows 7 or 8 would be a ‘downgrade’. Well, sorry people, that’s just nonsense. Many of its supporters now say it is ‘tried and true.’

It might be ‘tried and true’ now, but, when it was released, it was a disaster. So much so that Microsoft put off development on its replacement to focus on XP’s problems. Among them was a security hole big enough for Jupiter to go through.  And, People HATED it. Hated it worse than Vista or Windows 8 today. I recall many, negative reviews, articles and such that just skewered it.

There were Windows 98 diehards still. There were those who were clinging to Windows NT 4. It’s look and feel was called ‘Fisher Price’. Many thought its hardware requirements were ridiculous. It’s bundled apps, like Movie Maker, were laughed at (even though it was quite functional.) And, consider this:

  • George W Bush was in his first year of his two terms
  • The World Trade Center had only ceased to exist just weeks before
  • We still had a Space Shuttle program with all orbiters (but Challenger and Columbia broke up years later)
  • No one knew who this Obama guy was
  • Compaq was still a big name
  • Apple was still pretty insignificant

It wasn’t until the second service pack that XP became robust and stable. By that time, most Windows users had made the switch.  Those who disliked the Fisher Price interface switched back to the old, battleship gray, 3D-ish UI that adorned 95,98, Me, NT and 2000. There were all kinds of third party tools available to alter its appearance and the way it worked.  This indicated that its users still were not happy with XP.  Indeed, most business did not begin to switch to XP until 2006 or later.  By the time most business had switched, Microsoft had released Vista, at which point, there was this sudden XP fanboy thing.  Suddenly, it seemed, everyone who hated XP suddenly LOVED it and began hating Vista. The hate for Vista was so bad, that Microsoft, very quickly for them, got Windows 7 ready and out the door. Windows 7 seemed to be what people wanted and the mass migration, among ‘normal’ people started. They all skipped over Vista. The XP diehards, however, still clung to it.  At that point, Microsoft announced its imminent demise. And, then, NETBOOKS saved XP. Microsoft practically gave it away. And, in doing so, moved its death sentence way out.

Well, now that day is upon us.  It will be interesting to see how many stay on the aging platform and how many will, begrudgingly, move on Windows 7 or 8. Or, GASP! onto Mac or, worse, Linux. I doubt many will go that far.

Now, just because XP is being buried by Microsoft, does not mean it will just stop working. Quite the contrary, if you are careful, keep your antivirus updated, don’t do anything funky on the Internet, you should be able to continue to safely use XP for a long time.  Sure, as time goes on, those hot new games or applications will not run or even install on XP, but there is still enough of a user base that that will be a year or two off before it becomes a real problem for you.  If you move to Windows 7, you can still use Windows XP via XP mode. For Windows 8, you can always install a virtual machine and run it, safely, there. Of course, you can always just unplug it from the Internet and you know it should be nice and safe.

So, lets hear it for XP one more time…hip, hip, hoorah!

Windows 8.1 Update, it will be here soon

win8startctober 18, 2013…that’s the day Microsoft releases Windows 8.1, it’s fantastic update to the belittled Windows 8 release of a year ago.  If you are still running plain WIndows 8, you really have nothing to do other than just install the update. It will take care of that for you. IF, however, you are like me and like living dangerously, you have installed the ‘PREVIEW’ edition of 8.1.  And, well, you will have a  problem going to the official release.  ALL of your currently installed DESKTOP applications will have to be re-installed.  Your Windows Store Apps, while needing to be redownloaded in some cases, should weather the storm a bit better. Some of those apps, like Calendar and Mail, will have to be redownloaded since they are receiving major updates as well. We did not see all of them or all of the changes to them in the preview. Mail gets the biggest change as it was just junk anyway. However, more inoccuous apps like Music will also be updated, but not as drastically as Mail.

Be sure you make a backup of your system prior to the upgrade.  At the very least, you should:

  • gather all of your Desktop install media (if it had it) and any licensing info (like keys)
  • backup your photos, documents, source code (if you develop), art/graphics and any other filetypes you deem important
  • MAKE SURE YOU HAVE YOUR WINDOWS 8 KEY. This is very important.
  • All the patience you can muster.

It might be best to wait a day or two to download as their servers will be hit hard. This update fixes many things, enhances a few things and takes a couple small step backward, but I think it is a worthwhile updata and there will be quite a few who will want it as well.

I’d set aside a couple of hours, at least, to do the upgrade.

Remember, October 18 is the day.

Adafruit, USBTinyISP, Digital Signature and Windows 8: hoop jumping time

I do development work on a variety of PC’s in my home, Windows 7, Windows 8 and, yes, even on a Windows Vista laptop.  So far, it’s not been a problem. Oh, sure, my ancient copy of Visual Studio 2005 tells me it is not compatible with Windows 8, but ignore the warning and keep on going…no issues yet and I’ve been running it for awhile now.  However, drivers for things like USB programmers have not been an issue (well, OK, there was the one Radio Shack Serial to USB cable that Windows 8 hates) until now.

IMG_2603I go to setup one of my Windows 8 desktops with the Arduino IDE so I can do some work with the Adafruit Trinket. The IDE installs just fine. I make all of the changes that Adafruit says I need to make to the IDE so it can support the Trinket.  Everything is great…until I try to install USBTinyISP. It’s drivers are not digitally signed.  Windows 8 does not allow unsigned drivers.  Well, damn. So, off to the ‘net I go.

I BING ‘USBTinyISP and Windows 8’ and get this site, Next of Windows. Here, they have a short tutorial on how to enable the ability to install unsigned drivers. Now, I understand why Microsoft did this…it was designed to protect consumers and help ensure only good stuff gets on your computer.

Rather than retread what Next of Windows has already done, just go there and follow the instructions. There are a few restarts involved as you are accessing settings that are only mean to be accessed if your PC is having issues with Windows.

Now, while Microsoft may be partly to blame, I also wonder why Adafruit does not supply a signed driver or, at least, tell you how to install it under Windows 8. It is, after all, on the LEARNING System.

Once I got the driver installed, Arduino IDE was able to program the Trinket and all is well with the universe.

UPDATE: It seems that Adafruit DID, in fact, post instructions for installing on Windows 8. Apologies to Adafruit are in order [wipes egg from face.] Here’s the link to the page that actually says ‘Don’t forget, for Windows 8, you will have to turn off driver signing checking..’. I don’t know how I missed that.