Pebble Smartwatch and Windows Mobile 10: working, at last

WP_20160815_20_13_28_ProSince I got my Pebble Classic Smartwatch, I’ve only been able to use a smattering of its features. The problem is that Pebble does not and, apparently, will not, support the watch on Windows Mobile.  But, as the watch is very open, anyone is free to develop software to run on the watch and companion apps on any platform.  So, several enterprising souls did that. The second big issue was that Microsoft closed off parts of Windows Mobile-notifications and running in the background-which pretty much killed most of the functionality.

Well, fast forward a year and Microsoft has released Windows Mobile 10 Anniversary Update which fixed these issues.

So, there are now two apps that work with the Pebble smartwatch line of wearables: Pebble  Time Manager 10 and Pebble Essentials.WP_20160815_20_16_37_Pro

I downloaded Pebble Time Manager 10 and began using it.  For a free app, this thing rocks.  I did plunk down a buck to ‘unlock’ the health features and to give the developer SOMETHING for this great product, which is free.  Did I mention it is free?

Pebble Essentials I have not yet tried out, but will sometime soon. This write up is about the Time Manager.

Pebble Time Manager allows you to:

  • Download and install apps and watch faces from the Pebble store
  • Display all notifications from your mobile device
  • Track your health stats (provided you paid for the module AND your watch supports it)
  • Manage installed apps and watch faces
  • Direct Access to the Pebble Store

The notifications is huge.  Being able to get my phone’s notifications and NOT have to have an app running is tremendous.  Previously, you could get Twitter, Weather, email and, maybe Facebook notices but an app had to be running. Since the Windows AU came along, you no longer have to do that. You still run the app, but you can then dismiss it and the notifications keep on going.

WP_20160815_20_14_15_ProThe other big deal is direct access to the store.  Tap an app or watch face and see everything about. Tap the download icon and download the item to your phone. Tap it on the phone and it is sent to the watch.  The app, however, cannot tell you how much space you have, though.

Some watch apps require a settings page. Previously, you just took the defaults, but TIme Manager incorporates the ability to access and use these settings.  A nice touch.

The user interface could use some polish, but it works and is functional, if not a bit bland.  It does not have to be pretty, though, because it just works. And works well.

All in all, the app is worth much more than the developer charges (which is nothing) and is very easy to use. 

Stay tuned for more.  There are a lot of things it will do and some it won’t.  Oh, there’s a desktop version as well.

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Upgrading Your Toshiba Encore Mini from Windows 10 to Windows 10 Anniversary Update

I have a Toshiba Encore Mini Tablet that I bought a couple of years ago and managed to upgrade it to Windows 10 last year. I document that effort here.  It was quite a task as the Encore Mini is really crippled: 1 gb of RAM and only 16 gb of storage. Minimal, indeed.  So, how was going to do this upgrade?  Well, pretty much the same way as the original upgrade.

Since I do not use the Toshiba for much, mostly Candy Crush, web browsing and some video watching, I didn’t have a whole lot on the device. So, the first thing I had to do was clean it up.

I freed about two gigs of space and then tried the upgrade using the system update.  That did not work. I needed over five gigs on C:\, which would be next impossible. Windows itself takes nearly ten of the sixteen gigs, so freeing 5.76gb was a no go.  So, I tried to use an SD card. I put in a 32 gb card and tried again, this time telling it to use the SD card. That bloody thing still needed nearly three gb on C:!

I then remembered the Media Creation Tool.  I put the card in my desktop and fired up the tool.  UGH! It did not let me use the SD card!

WP_20160804_21_48_19_ProI figured out, as well, that the bloody SD card was bad. I kept having to format it…which you should not have to do. I put it aside and found a 16gb card.  I then tried everything again and…failure greeted me at every step.  As a last ditch effort, I downloaded the 32 bit ISO to the SD card. Put it in the Toshiba, mounted the ISO as a drive and ran setup from there.

Setup did point out the lack of space on C:\ but did allow me to use the SD card AND 2gb on C:\.

The upgrade took quite a bit of time.  I’m not sure, because, after an hour, I went to bed.  I finished overnight.

When it finished the initial user setup, it began to hang on me.  I tried everything I could think of, even trying to reset the operating system using the OS Refresh/Reset feature. They, too, locked up. On a whim, I removed the SD card and rebooted the tablet.  It has worked perfectly since.  I have WP_20160805_07_38_37_Proformatted a 4gb SD card and that has been working splendidly.  I’m not sure why the ISO SD Card caused a problem, but I am also glad I figured out what was wrong.

The tablet has been running well.  It is a bit speedier, but that might be because it is a new install of Windows.

So, there you go, a tablet that, by any definition, is a turd, has been upgraded–not painlessly–to the latest and greatest Windows.  Life is good.

NOTE: One issue I had, post upgrade, was that Windows would stop responding after logging in.  After about 20 to 30 seconds, what ever was running would continue, but shell would stop.  I solved the problem by dismounting and removing the SD card that contained the ISO.