Mario and iPhone 7…Pokemon and Apple Watch

Apple had its September press event to announce Apple Watch, Series 2, iOS 10 and iPhone 7.  But, perhaps the biggest thing announced at the event was a game.

Early on in the event, Tim Cook said that there were over 500,000 games in the app store, but that one had been missing. Rather, one character had been missing…MARIO. And, with that, he introduced Shigeru Miyamoto, the creator of Mario.

Mr. Miyamoto explained the new game while a demo was being played on the big screen.  This Mario game looks and sounds like a Wii U game, but is controlled via touch on the iPhone or iPad.  You use a single finger to control Mario’s jumps…the longer you hold your finger down, the higher he jumps. 

While the game looked great, the game play is like a neutered Super Mario Brothers 2D side scroller. Neutered in that it appeared that Mario only goes in one direction in single hand play.  The goal is to collect as many coins as you can and raise the end of level flag, before the time runs out. 

More importantly, the game will NOT be a ‘freemium’ game in the traditional sense. You only pay one time, there are no in game purchases.  There’s no having to wait two hours for your lives to replenish.  It is a nice change from the current game mobile game model.

Now, for the other announcements, and I’m not going into detail as it has already been covered else where.

Apple Watch 2 will be out in September and will be faster and more responsive.  Oh, and Pokemon GO! is coming to the Apple Watch.  With some health monitoring additions, this looks pretty decent.

iPhone 7, though, is what I am more excited to talk about. 

Now, before I go on, let me say that I am still not an Apple fan and I LOVE my Windows Mobile 10 phone(s). 

So, what has me excited about the iPhone 7?  Well, even though it isn’t a huge, earth shattering advance in mobile technology, the camera, faster processor and MICROSOFT have me excited for the new iPhone. 

The iPhone 7 will feature a new image sub system, new API’s and better optics. In addition, iPhone 7Plus, the phablet edition, will feature TWO 12 mp cameras in addition to the front camera.  The new image processor enables the phone to record in 4K video as well.

Here are some of the nice new photo related features, from Apple:

  • New Apple-designed Image Signal Processor, which processes over 100 billion operations on a single photo in as little as 25 milliseconds, resulting in incredible photos and videos;
  • New 7-megapixel FaceTime HD camera with wide color capture, advanced pixel technology and auto image stabilization for even better selfies; and
  • New Quad-LED True Tone flash that is 50 percent brighter than iPhone 6s including an innovative sensor that detects the flickering in lights and compensates for it in videos and photos.

Iapple-iphone7plus-zoomn addition to the photo features, Microsoft’s entire suite of apps that are on the iPhone mean that I can continue using my Microsoft services and apps with my Windows 10 desktop just as seamlessly as I can, now, with my Windows Mobile phone.

There are other things, like the subtle changes to iOS and to the phone chassis itself.

There are things I don’t like, such as the removal of the headphone jack, inability to upgrade storage via SD card, no way to project the phone to another screen (at least, I haven’t seen this) and the lack of home screen tiles…a feature I’ve really grown to love on my Windows Mobile phone.  In fact, the lack of live tiles is almost a deal breaker for me. Almost.

For now, I am on the verge of mothballing my Windows Mobile phone and going Apple again.  I’m going to have play with one for a bit.   But, today’s announcements look encouraging.  Of course, if I wait a year, I may like iPhone 8 more…

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Microsoft, Apple, T-Mobile…They take a lot and give little

win10mobileT-Mobile.  The Un-Carrier.  This company, led by it’s uncool CEO, John Legere, claims to be different.  And, in a few regards, that is true.  They led the march to do away with subsidies and contracts.  Getting rid of the contracts was a good thing.  However, the replacement plans by T-Mobile and the others leave little to be desired.  This company also bills itself as having a fast, reliable network.  That’s debatable. In the Richmond, Virginia area, anyway, they are spotty—despite having PINK all over the area map.  Speeds are so-so.  They also advertise the binge-on program where you can consume all of the video streaming, from a select few services, and won’t affect your data or speed. What they fail to say is that you need specific plans to qualify.  Lastly, the ‘Get Thanked Tuesdays’ promotion only applies to certain customers—i.e. those who have Android or iOS devices and those not on prepaid plans. If you have a Windows Phone/Mobile, Blackberry or other device or you have those and are on a pre paid plan, you are out of luck. No thanks on Tuesdays or any other day.  (To be fair, they did try  to make up for it by giving me a credit, free pizza and, in last Tuesday’s event, they texted me the codes—but did not mention I had to use them right away. My fault there, though, it is in the rules.)  The no hoops, hurdles and strings mantra does not apply if you use anything but iOS or Android.

Apple.  Another company that loves to dump on its customers. But, Apple, at least, makes you feel good about getting dumped on. Hell, it’s a PRIVILAGE.  This company has, for the most part, products that, if from any other company, would put you to sleep. But, they slap that stupid logo on them, charge a mint and invite you into these sterile, wood and glass stores, and attempt to make you feel like you OWE them a purchase.  What’s really odd…and lame…is the uniforms the employees wear…..JEANS and BLUE T-SHIRTS.  What the hell is that?  You want me to pay two grand for a computer, I’m in what is supposed to look like a high-end store, and the person who is assisting me is dressed as if he or she was playing kick ball on a school lunch break? Seriously?  And what’s up with that stupid watch?

Microsoft. OH MY LORD.  This company makes it damn near impossible to like.  Everything I have liked, from the Zune to Windows Mobile 10 to Windows 10 itself, has had features removed, been crippled in some way or out right cancelled. I don’t’ need to say anything about Zune…its dead and so is my 30gb player. So, I’ll move on…to Windows Mobile 10. Now, a few years ago, MS bought Nokia’s phone business.  And promptly drove it into the ground.  They released Windows Mobile 10 by gutting many of the nice features of Windows Phone 8, including stability, reliability and many, many features like the hubs.  Now, the company says they are removing features because no one uses them, like FM Radio and the Kids Corner.  Guess what? I DO! This is the same reason they removed Media Center from Desktop Windows. Guess what? I used that too.  Now, Microsoft is further limiting another of its once great products: OneDrive.  They lured you in with tons of free online storage, then cut it all out but 5gb (like Apple) but you could still do a lot. Now, that is being limited as well. You cannot use it to share files a lot or share large files. I guess they are getting hammered for bandwidth. I don’t care, they opened the door and invited us in, now they want to boot us out after an hour.  Why should I bother at all?  They did this with remote sharing as well.  They killed off a terrific photography tool, photosynth.  Their OneCare was great, they killed it.  Windows Mobile has the potential to still be great, even with all of the neutering but, it, too, will languish. That’s what this company does best.

Honorable Mention: GOOGLE. Man, I could rant for days, but I’m not.  Suffice it to say that I will likely be forced to use Android again. I don’t like Android, but my distaste for iOS is worse than my dislike of Android.  One last thing, Google is far worse than Microsoft when it comes to product support and growth. Just look at the Google dead product grave yard.

This may sound like sour grapes, and to some extent, it is.  I’ve been burned a lot by these and other companies.  However, the problems stated here affect more than just myself. In the case of Apple, the deception costs real money.  In the case of Microsoft, it’s not only money, but a lot of frustration as well.  This company needs to stop its practice of introducing things, getting you hooked and then either taking them away or severely handicapping them.  It has really made me re-think my whole Microsoft affinity. 

So, what great Android phones are out there?  I need a good, non-Apple replacement for my Zune too.  My Zune HD is starting to have problems and I don’t know how much longer Windows will run the Zune software.  I want a dedicated MP3 player, I don’t like using my phone for media.  Lastly, what online storage solutions are out there that are low cost or free and are unfettered? 

Apple, you are done…Microsoft, your dominance is near the end and Google, welcome aboard: how Android won the game, via Chrombooks

Change. It is a difficult thing to go through, but, it is inevitable. Nearly thirty years ago, CP/M was THE operating system and 8080/Z80 based computers were THE thing. I remember thinking they’d be around FOREVER. They didn’t make it past 1986, when IBM began to take over the personal computer industry. And, so, we are near that crossroad today.

Google has announced that Android apps will be available ‘soon’ for ChromeOS. That is, as they say, a game changer.

Why?

Well Chromebooks are inexpensive. Small computers using ChromeOS are inexpensive and do not need Wintel level power to do things.  Android apps, likewise, are mostly designed to run on cheap smartphones with power that comes close to that of a cheap desktop or laptop computer.  Combine the two and…WOW…that is a game changer, folks.

A friend of mine (one day, Sam, we will meet in person) has been touting these Chromebook things for a few years now.  I’ve always kind of poo-poo’ed them as being a browser on a minimalist Linux.  However, you put Android abilities in there and…BOOM!   A real challenge to Wintel.

Chromebooks already outsell the Macintosh. It will be a while before they supplant Windows, but, I think the writing is on the wall.  I am a die hard Windows fan. I’ve loved the environment and, later, the operating system since the 2.1 days. But, change is inevitable and Microsoft knows this. Pretty much the only product they still sell that is not completely available on other platforms is the Visual Studio development tool suite. And, I think, it won’t be long and you will be using that on Android. On a Chromebook. 

So, how is Google doing this? Merging the two operating systems?

No. No merging.  No AppV or Virtual machines either. NO, they are using containers that have the Android framework embedded in them.  This is a quite clever approach as it not only allows the app to ‘see’ the underlying filesystem and hardware it is running on, it also means apps can talk to each other and that is HUGE.  What good is a photo editor that cannot get to the photos?

It also means the applications run AT FULL SPEED.  Think about that.  Now the Android GAME world is open to ChromeOS.  In fact ALL Android apps will work this way, no developer changes required. Candy Crush Jelly Donuts and Coffee will run, full speed, full screen, on a cheap $120 (US) Chromebook just as well as it does on that Moto G.  This, my friends, is not only cool, but awesome.

I am no fan of Google, but this is a clever and very smart way to bring Android into the home in something other than a phone.

Now, I need to buy myself a Chromebook, get a good book on Java development and retool myself.  Apple, you need to get a clue. Your walled garden is about to be overtaken by weeds when your gardeners leave for greener pastures.  From Google.

You can read more about it here.

iPad Mini has broken glass? No problem…

10633983_968983429838079_2216291504368981093_oA few months back, my lovely wife’s iPad Mini was cracked, right around the button, by my then two year old son.  Now, these things are tough and Xander had thrown it a few times prior to that fateful day.  It hit the floor and then the corner of a cabinet and cracked the glass right by the button.  Over the next month or so, we continued to use the device but…it was dropped once more and, this time, more damage ocurred.

Even in a protective case, the damage got worse and glass shards started coming off, so we shelved it.  Being cheap, we did not want to spend the hundred or so dollars to have it repaired and, on ‘Black Friday’, we took advantage of the $35 (US) Kindle. The iPad Mini just sat, battery drained, on a box under my desk.

Until a few days ago (Feb 13, 2016) when I found a cheap replacement kit for the glass.  This kit came with the glass, home button and the digitizer plus tools to remove the broken glass and install the new glass.  The best part? It was UNDER twenty five US dollars.

I ordered it and it arrived a couple of days later, thanks to Amazon Prime.10357769_968983373171418_8161123942176373028_o

I set about to remove the old glass, which had the white bezel, and install the new glass with the black bezel. I must say, I like the black bezel more.

The process took about three hours as the glass was tough to remove. In hindsight, I did it wrong.

All of the processes I read about said to use a heat gun to soften the adhesive and make it easier to remove. I did NOT do that.  I wish I had.  I ended up destroying the old glass and, in the process, getting little shards all over my hands.

The process is not difficult, but it is a pain in the ass and very tedious.  The sides came up easy, it was the bloody  corners that caused the problem. There’s not much to this, but you need to know a few things…

So, here’s a short, step by step list of things I did (except #1):

  1. Use a heat gun or hair dryer on high to soften the adhesive. Be careful not to overheat the device.
    1. If you do not, you must be very careful with prying up the old glass, it is very brittlle and will break. Easily. Very Easily.
  2. Using a small screwdriver or similar device, gently pry the glass up. Pick a corner and slowly work around the perimeter of the device. 
  3. Once the glass is off, lay it over – if possible – so you can rest the LCD on top. If you cannot, find a soft cloth to lay the LCD on when ready.
  4. There are four screws in each corner of the LCD. Unscrew them and set them aside.  The two small screws by the home button you can ignore.
  5. Be careful, the WiFi antennae are right at the edge of the metal casing, I darn near destroyed them.  It is also easy to unplug them. If you do, no problem, you can plug them back in. At this point, you should not be able to unplug them as there is a cover over them.
  6. Once you have unscrewed the LCD, you will need to remove the black tape holding in place, be careful not to cut or destroy the tape, you will need it later.
  7. Gently lay the LCD over the area you set aside earlier.
  8. Next, there is a metal cover under the LCD that is screwed down by 16 very, very tiny screws.
  9. Remove the screws and gently remove the panel.
  10. Next, on lower right, where the cables are, there a small metal cover with four or so screws. Remove it.
  11. Be careful now, this is where those Wifi antennae live.
  12. The two larger flat cables need to be unplugged. 
  13. Unplug the LCD cable and then the digitizer/home button cable.
  14. Remove any excess adhesive from around the edge of the case. It needs to be clean.
  15. Gently plug in the new home button/digitizer cable
  16. Gently plug in the LCD Panel. It takes very little force and you can only plug them in one way.
  17. Replace the small metal cover and then the larger one.
  18. Replace the LCD panel.
  19. Remove the sticky back tape and any other protective plastic from the underside of the new glass.
  20. Carefully place it on the device and firmly press down around the sides and the top and bottom.
  21. Turn on the device, if charged, make sure it works.
  22. If all went well, congratulations, you save yourself a lot of money.

Those screws are very, very small.  There is no real reason why there are sixteen on the big metal plate.  I think they could have gotten by with half that number or even a quarter of them. At any rate, someone felt they were necessary. 

So, the take away here is that if you are going to do this, get a kit that includes the home button and the digitizer. Some only have one or none of them.

12698567_968983143171441_5796826882905185056_oAmazon is a great source for things like this, but so is eBay.  If you take your time and are patient, you can do this with ease.  Patience is the big thing here.  I nearly lost mine with the small screws. Did I mention that they are small? Oh, yeah, sorry. But, they are DAMNED SMALL!

Good luck if you undertake this endevor. 

Windows Mobile 10: It’s tough being a fan

About seven years ago, I got genuinely excited about a new consumer product.  That product had WP_20141110_009all kinds of promise: price, performance, looks, ease of use and the ability to be a small computer I could carry around with me to surf the web, read my mail, do some short writing stints and more. Oh, I could make and receive phone calls.  That device was the Palm Pre smartphone.

I laughed at people who waited in line, before a store even opened, for Apple products.  I thought it was absurd. Yet, there I was, with about 15 other good people, waiting in front of a Sprint store to get my Palm Pre.  I don’t recall how much I paid, but, at that point, I didn’t much care as it was not the seven hundred or so that the iPhone was then.

Oh boy, I got my phone and a haircut and rushed home to play with my new toy.  This thing was just spectacular.  Touch screen AND a keyboard (it was a slider phone that looked like big pebble) and was super easy to use.  And, its browser really worked…no more quasi browser like my Windows Mobile 5 powered Motorola Q.  The Pre was just great.  For about a year. That’s when the cheapness of the poorly designed plastic body came into play.  See, the hardware, while attractive, was a disaster.  The body had lots strain from the sliding and would eventually crack.  The battery did last long either. It would die and not even be turned on.  And so ended my love for the Pre, but not WebOS.  There has not been anything close until last year.CIMG0118

Lets roll back time a bit.  The aforementioned Moto Q ran Windows Mobile 5, a cramped and poor copy of desktop Windows. Frankly, it was an abomination.  The interface was pretty bad.  The included applications were awful and the support from third parties was not great. In short, Windows Mobile 5, and all versions before it, was just awful.  It’s only plus was the Windows Live application that, in many aspects, was similar to Google Now or Cortana. You could talk to it and it would, verbally as well as visually, answer you. I used it a lot in the last few months I used the Q.

myWin10PhoneFast forward a few years and Micorosoft is, once again, hawking a product called Windows Mobile for Phones.  This time, the operating system is just gorgeous. And functional.  It’s everything that a mobile operating system should be and more.  It is as good today as webOS was then.  And, it can be used as a desktop operating system as well, via a feature called Continuum. Indeed, on its own, installed in desktop hardware, it could work wonderfully with a keyboard and a mouse. 

Yet, it gets little love and Microsoft is to blame, mostly,  They do not promote it or its capabilities. They port its great features to iOS and Android and even save it for last when developing apps for mobile devices.  It is treated like a distant cousin.  But, that doesn’t mean it does not have fans or support. True, it has few of each, but they are there.  And, now, there are more and more hardware manufacturers jumping on board.  In addition to Microsoft, there are companies like Acer, HP, Asus, the former Sony brand turmyWin10Phone3ned company, VAIO, and a host of others.  The phones range from just OK to stellar.  Most are able to support Continuum (it requires a certain class of processor and 2gb of ram, minimum) and all run Windows 10. 

As a user and a fan, I often find it difficult to stay both when I see stories about its demise, when I see Microsoft putting it on the back burner for some lame iOS project or hear the CEO say in one sentence just how important it is while the next sentence he would, essentially, say it was not that important after all.  Indeed, it is difficult being a fan and staying enthusiastic about the platform. 

Windows Mobile 10, Windows 10 Mobile, or what ever they call it, has so much potential–more than its desktop companion, I think.  There’s no reason why Microsoft could not port Visual Studion to WM10.  With a mouse and keyboard attached (in Continuum) a developer could very easily develop on the phone.  This powerful OS has the potential to, provided the hardware supports it, completely replace your desktop.  Hell, the iPhone could if Apple pulled its head out of its ass.

WP_20150107_003So, yeah, I went from one doomed smartphone to another seemingly doomed platform.  Oh, in between I had an Android and an iPhone 4. Didn’t like them, hated the Android and, early on, liked the iPhone until i ‘upgraded’ to iOS 7…ugh, what a piece of crap that was.  But, I digress.

Even though I hated my Android phone, if I do get away from Windows Mobile, I think I would have to get a Samsung Galaxy whatever. They are beautiful phones and Android is, finally, getting useable. Some of the siliness is gone, but the fracturing is still there.  So, why not iPhone? Well, it’s Apple and that means there are lots of costs.  The hardware is very nice and iOS 9 looks great. My son has a 6 and loves it.  I’ve played with it and it is far and away better than the version I had.  But, it is still Apple and that means you are married to them and that is one marriage I do not care to join.WP_20141110_018

So, how long do I have with my favorite mobile operating system? Well, until Microsoft says they won’t support it or they dump the business they paid billions for, a few short years ago.  I am pining for the Lumia 950, but that Acer Jade Primo looks awfully nice too.  The VAIO looks good as well.  So, there are a few non-Microsoft phones that I would buy, but…I’d rather get a 950. Unfortunately, I have, yet again, picked the wrong carrier (Verizon, which hates Microsoft) and still have about a year left on my bloody contract.  I’m hoping there is a more drool worthy phone out by then. Until then, I’ll continue along with my beat up ICON. It is still a great phone and works like a champ, running Windows Mobile 10. 

Did I mention I love Windows Mobile 10? Oh, right. 

Tiny Basic, Signetics 2650 and a SC/MP: HalfByte’s early days

I am sitting here, banging away on a run of the mill HP Windowsc03742269 computer. It has a decent set of specs for today, but is no match for even a low end gaming PC or a research oriented computer. For the few games I play, the Internet browsing, code writing and Microsoft Office tasks, it works well.  Compare it to the comptuers that I started out with, however, it might as well be a Cray Supercomputer. 

Indeed, this AMD based HP would be the hottest thing in 1974, the year I can remember first ‘using’ a home computer (or, actually, ANY kind of computer.)  Back then, home computers were barely out of science fiction. In fact, that first computer was the Mark 8 ‘mini’ computer first showing up on the pages of Radio-Electronics Magazine.  It was an Intel based 8008 ‘beast’.  It was something that my Dad was working on and, once it got to a bootable point, I was hooked.

mark8_re_coverIf I remember correctly, this thing was a pain in the butt to use. Just to ‘boot’ it up, you had to key in a sequence of sixteen bytes, one bit at a time, on the front panel.  Once they were keyed in, the computer would start.  My Dad had this ‘TV Typewriter’ that we used to talk to the computer. It was, in reality, a Serial based video terminal, but it was new then.  A fellow by the name Don Lancaster designed it. My Dad bought the bare board and built it himself. That’s how things were done, you did not go to a Best Buy and just buy one. No, you built it.

So, this computer couldn’t do much.  My Dad bought something called ‘SCELBI Tiny Basic’ on a paper tape.  He had scrounged (something he was very good at) a paper tape reader and we were able to load this program into the computer. He would painstakingly key in a Tiny Basic program that I could then use.  I was only nine at the time, so programming was not something I thought about, but I was intrigued.

Fast forward a year and my father built another, more powerful, cTinyTrekBasicListingomputer. This one, a sixteen bit behemoth, was based on the Signetics 2650 microprocessor.  Man, this thing was great.  Signetics made them for quite a long time and they special because of their architecture: 16 bit internal, 8 bit bus.  It was unique among a sea of ‘me too’ chips.  More importantly, there was a dynamite version of Tiny Basic for the chip. This is when I started to figure out this programming thing.  It was addictive and started purely by accident.  See, my Dad was an engineer and built a lot of things. But, he was not good at this programming thing.  He, one day, gave me a program listing, the Tiny Basic manual he had printed out and told me to figure out how to get the program listing to work with Tiny Basic.  It was a Lunar Lander game from a very famous (at the time) book: Dave Ahl’s 101 computer games in Basic. I figured out that some statements just would not work, which ones needed small changes and I even figured out how to make some work by making a ‘gosub’ function-which is what I called a subroutine then.  It took me several weeks, but i got the game to work. Then, I found out, that my Dad already had a version that worked and was specifically for that version of Tiny Basic.  At first, I was upset. All that time I wasted.  Something struck me though…I had a blast making it work.  That is what he had hoped would happen. 

It paid off too.

Now, I had the bug in me. I WANTED to figure out and learn this programming stuff.  I started making small programs…mostly code that made Tiny Basic do thing it was not supposed to do. Like string handling and ‘graphics’ by making the cursor move about the screen and ‘drawing’ with ASCII characters.

I also got my very own computer. 

That computer, based on the National Semiconductor SC/MP, had 16k of RAM (quite a bit then) and a version of Tiny Basic called NI/BL.  Nibble, as I called it, was quite sophisticated for its day. Written for control applications (the SC/MP was an industrial controller, much like the ATMEL line of microcontrollers) Nibble was able to directly talk to the hardware, had the DO-UNTIL construct for looping, direct memory addressing, direct serial line addressing and memory management.  The computer also a cursor addressable video terminal and cassette I/O, which required me to write a ‘loader’ application in Nibble.  I could save my code just by typing LIST and pressing record, but I had to write code to load it back because the cassette was too fast for the input routine of Nibble.  I had to read the tape, 128 bytes at a time, poke it into a memory page, wait 1 second, and get more code.  The cassette was controlled by a relay, so I could start and stop it as needed. A 2K program took a couple of minutes to load, but it was much faster than typing.  I eventually had a paper tape reader and punch as well.

Ferguson-BigBoard-IBy now, my Dad had a disk drive based Z80 computer and something called ‘CP/M’.  It was a computer made from the ‘furgeson big board’.  The Big Board was very close to the design of modern day motherboards: integrated memory, cpu logic, video terminal and disk controller on one board.  Prior to that, we used the ‘S-100’ bus.  In this setup, the ‘motherboard’ only contained the connectors for the bus itself and no real logic.  Some had a power supply, most did not.  Each piece of the computer was on a separate board.  The Big Board, however, had it all on the SAME board.   It was very cool and was used as the design in the first real ‘personal’ computer from Xerox: the Xerox 820.  I had one.  My dad was able to get the board and built it into a desk, along with two 8 inch disk drives, keyboard, monitor and a printer.  I was set now.  In the interim, I also bought a ZX-81 and got a TRS-80 Color Computer. But, the Xerox is what I did my ‘real’ stuff on and the others were relegated to games or collected dust. 

But…

Before the Xerox 820, my passion was the ZX-81 because I BUILT IT.  zx81adI bought the kit with money got back on my very first income tax refund.  Yep. $99 was sent to Sinclair for the kit.  Wow, I built it and…it did not work.  In looking at my work and the schematic, my Dad figured out that I was missing a resistor…to pull the Z80 reset pin low (I think) which allowed it to start up. I may have that backward, it has been so long. Once I soldered the resistor into place (there was a spot on the board, and it was on the schematic, but it was missing from the parts list and instructions) the Zed Ex came to life. I was thrilled. My Dad, he was unimpressed.  Not sure why, but he always hated Sinclair and anything Uncle Clive ever did. That little computer was awesome. To this day, I wish I still had the six or so that I had (I collected them for a bit, was going to make something great…never did.)  This thing introduced me to wanting to get into electronics more, but that waited until recently with my Arduino stuff.

The TRS-80 Color Computer also grabbed my heart.  I had one well into the late 1990’s or early double 00’s.  I don’t remember when, but I gave it to some kid at a hamfest.  Games, peripherals, the computer, etc.  He was so excited. I hope it inspired him. At any rate, the CoCo introduced me to GUI’s too.  I wrote a couple in Extended Basic.  Went on to write one in assembler, but it sucked.

Looking back, however, I think I was happiest on that 2650 and the SC/MP. They were, comparatively speaking, so basic and so primitive and the things I could do with them. Man, that was exciting. Exciting enough to keep me interested (well, there was that time when I discovered the opposite sex, but that is something for another time…and blog) in pursuing programming as a career.

I look back with much fondness and some sadness as well.  Those were the days when I bonded with my Dad.  Learned quite a bit and was genuinely excited.  Names like Les Soloman, Don Lancaster and Dave Ahl were the ‘rock stars’ of my world.  They were among the founders of the home computer revolution that you never hear about. Sure, I saw Microsoft rise, witnessed Apple’s few innovations (Apple ][, Apple //c) and saw IBM create an entire industry (the Wintel computer) but, more importantly, that time with my Dad and a small number of class mates in high school. Neil, Patrick…you guys rock.  Sadly, though, those computers are history and my Dad…well he is too.

I miss those days.

Apple Announcements 2015: iPad Pro, Watch, iPhone

Microsoft has often be accused of ‘firing up the Xerox’ to copy Apple’s ‘innovations.’  Well, during the Apple presentation on Sept 9, it seems that they are the ones who ‘fired up the Xerox.’  Indeed, the new 12.9 inch iPad Pro they introduced has many Surface 3 Pro features, including the docking keyboard and the pen, which Apple calls ‘the Apple Pencil.’  Cute.  Of course, this harkens back to the Steve Jobs comment “if you see a stylus, they blew it.” Of course, the Apple apologists will say that he didn’t really mean it that way.  Uh huh, right.

iPadPro_Pencil_Lifestyle1-PRINTAll kidding aside, the iPad Pro is a credible machine.  At nearly 13 inches, the screen is big enough to adequately display two apps, side by side. Interestingly, there’s no drag and drop between applications. You copy/cut and paste.  An odd thing to leave out.  Maybe iOS 9.2.

The iPad Pro’s stylus has a nice feature that lets the Pro know the angle and pressure the user is placing on the screen’s surface.  Sensors built into the device communicate this data back to the software, which, in turn, acts on it.  Designer’s can now draw fine lines or really thick lines without having to lift the stylus. 

Microsoft was on stage demoing Office for iOS.  Yep, it is a credible package that turns the iPad Pro into a real, honest to goodness productivity device. 

The Pro’s keyboard dock is very, very similar to the Surface 3 Pro’s keyboard.  In fact, there were many, many similarities, so much so, that it seems that Apple was acknowledging Microsoft’s lead in this space.  A refreshing turn of events.

The iPad Pro also boasts four speakers.  The sound, one would hope, is far better than the tinny monoaural sound that comes out of them now.

On the watch front, native apps are now available as is several new bands.

Apple TV got a major upgrade with the addition of in device memory, a redesigned controller and an app store. Yes, it now runs apps and games with ‘stunning, console quality graphics.’ Someone quipped ‘yeah, if the console is a Wii.’  Hey, the Wii is still a cool little console.  Leave it alone or I’ll give you a wedgie!

Prices for the Apple TV are $149 and $199 for the 32gb and 64gb versions.  No 4k yet.

Prices for the iPad range from $799 to $1069.

Of course, the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus were also on display.  The killer feature:  living images.  This is a feature that Microsoft has had in its Lumia smart phones for quite sometime.  Basically, the camera buffers about four seconds of video.  The best frame, for the iPhone and in the ‘middle’ is taken where as the Lumia is usually the best of the last frames.  Either way, the effect is impressive.  Apple has taken it a step further and provides magic that also captures audio.  The Lumia does not do that.

There were other interesting things about the phones…faster processor, more internal RAM, 12mp camera, but the living images is, by far, the best new feature.

Head over to CNET for much more detail.